Walk Lynmouth to Watersmeet (just like Julia Bradbury did)

Perhaps a little more challenging than you would have thought from the ‘Best of British Walks’ on the telly… But what a wonderful walk. You do need a fair degree of fitness to tackle the 2nd part, but you could turn back after visiting the tearooms to avoid the steep bit!

A couple of days following our extended walk down into Lynmouth we felt ready to tackle the walk that we had seen Julia Bradbury complete on ‘Great British Walks’ – they showed the easiest bits of course!

We drove down to Lynmouth, parking in the car park by the river. This is where the walk starts and we lost no time having breakfast or anything this time! We headed straight to the back of the car park to cross the river by the small footbridge. The river is so pretty here it’s difficult to imagine that this is the new course forged as a result of the flood in the 1950’s.

The walk starts nice and gently, meandering along the riverside, through the trees with a choice after about 1/2 mile of continuing along the river or heading directly through the woods. We chose the riverside as we knew there were a few areas of interest to see.

This part of the walk is easy and very pretty. We found the site of the Lynrock mineral water factory right alongside the river. They also made ginger beer here right up until 1939. The Atlee brothers who owned the factory lived at Myrtleberry which you pass a little further upriver. Read all about it here.

After a couple of miles you reach Watersmeet House which is now a rather lovely tearoom. Unfortunately we visited shortly after businesses had been allowed to re-open and the Cream Tea available was not freshly made, which was rather disappointing. We shall just have to return in happier times 🙂 (Sounds like a perfect excuse to me!)

After our little break and a quick chat with a fellow camper from our campsite we headed off for the more difficult part of the walk (at this point we didn’t know just how hard it was!) But first we took the detour further upriver (and it was UP) to find the waterfalls. Which we initially walked straight past, only realising our mistake when we got to the road… (Incidentally, if you were to be staying at the same campsite we did – Lynmouth Holiday Retreat – you can see a sign on the road for The Beggars Roost (which is at the entrance to the site), so we think you could probably walk back from here if you wanted to).

Heading back downhill we spotted a small set of steps down to the river which led to a viewpoint to see the waterfall. Remember it had been a very hot, dry summer thus far, and as such the waterfall wasn’t flowing very strongly…. We think it is probably far better in the spring or autumn.

We got back on the correct path (behind the house), which starts climbing almost immediately. And keeps on climbing forever (well, it felt like it anyway – I did consider turning around and going back the easy way at 1 point….). Then, just when you think you’re at the top you turn a corner and, oh look, it’s still going up. Didn’t tell us about THAT did you Julia??!! No, I think you mentioned that there were a ‘couple’ of steep sections after the house. Hmmm…

Having said that once we finally reached the top the views were stunning, and then we had the pleasure of finding a rather nice pub, The Blue Ball Inn at Countisbury, for a well earned 2nd pitstop 🙂

Suitably refreshed we set off for the final section of the walk along the South West Coast Path. Accessed via the churchyard we visited the tiny church of Countisbury, which was rather charming, before picking up the path along the cliff.

Whilst we were glad to finally be heading downhill, it was quite steep in places of this narrow path on the edge of the cliff… Once again though, stunning views 🙂 culminating in a welcome return to Lynmouth to give a final total of 7 miles hiked.

And of course a quick drink in The Ancient Mariner topped the day off nicely!

We would highly recommend this walk even if it’s just to the tearooms and back to Lynmouth. We will almost definitely return and do it again!

Next time read all about our adventures (and walks…) in Symonds Yat!

Related Posts:

Walking in Lynmouth and Lynton

Travelling to Lynmouth? Don’t do what we did!

A weekend in Symonds Yat

Around the UK: A Photo Diary #2 – East Anglia

I’ve decided now to just put some photos up!  Again they’re all from our 2017 trip and I’ve given links to relevant posts should you want any more detail of the areas shown.

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Maldon

Campsite – D’Arcy Equestrian

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Framlingham

 Dunwich (& Southwold)

Aldeburgh (& Thorpeness)

Orford

Campsite – Fishers Field

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Norwich 

Broads

Norfolk Broads

Campsite – Lower Wood Farm

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Langham

Cromer

Campsite – Woodlands, Sheringham

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Cambridge

Campsite – Highfield Touring Park

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Lavenham 

Campsite – Kings Forest Caravan Park, West Stow 

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Castle Rising

Holkham Bay

Sandringham

Campsites – Whitehall Farm, Burnham-Thorpe

Manor Park, Hunstanton

Other potential posts of interest:

Our time in Essex, Suffolk, Norfolk and Cambridgeshire

Around the UK: a Photo Diary #1 Kent, The Garden of England

 

We used the Rough Guide to Norfolk & Suffolk to help decide places to visit and walks to take.  Very useful as ever 🙂

My next gallery post will cover Lincolnshire, Rutland and Northamptonshire (for the British Grand Prix).

This post may contain affiliate links. If you buy an item after clicking on one of these links we may receive a small commission at no extra cost to you. If you choose to buy anything it’s very much appreciated, thank you.

Tattershall Castle, with an impromptu air display. Then enjoying a film in the Kinema in the Woods

The day after we discovered Woodhall Spa we returned to watch a film, Dunkirk, in the Kinema in the Woods.

Very close by lies Tattershall, a very pretty village with an impressive church and a magnificent castle (now managed by the National Trust).

The film was starting at 5.15pm so in the afternoon we decided to visit Tattershall first.

As we left the car park we saw that there was also a row of Bede Houses (almshouses) in front of the church.  We’re convinced that these have each been doubled in size by knocking 2 into 1, as we thought we could see where some windows may have previously been doors.   This has actually been borne out by the bit of research that we’ve done.

The church was a really open space and we were told that it was originally very dark as the windows made it so.  It’s only been relatively recently that the windows were renewed and lightened.

After visiting the church we headed over to the castle (which is accessed on a path passing the church).  The first building you see is the guardhouse which is now the ticket office.

 

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The Guardhouse of Tattershall Castle

We started our visit in front of the castle exploring the moat and what did originally stand on the green area – there were actually many more buildings on the site, including the kitchens that were separate to the main castle.

 

Then before we went into the castle itself we heard the distinctive sound of a jet overhead.  We proceeded to enjoy an impromptu display with the jet doing barrel rolls and flying over us several times in the course of the next 10 minutes or so.  When he landed another one took off!  This was from RAF Coningsby which is very nearby.

What’s left of the castle is very up together – even more so than Castle Rising.  We’re convinced that you could hook up to the electricity, pop in a bathroom and move in..!

The only thing to spoil our visit was a group of screamy kids and extremely shouty adults with them.  We just headed straight up to the roof so that we weren’t on the same floor at any time and then worked our way down..

Here’s a few pictures of the castle itself.

 

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View from the roof of Tattershall Castle

From here we headed back to Woodhall Spa and straight to the Kinema.  We went straight in (having arrived hungry and cleared the shop out of sweets…).  We were seated in Row E, about halfway back – literally.

When the adverts were finished and just before the film was to start the curtains were drawn across and then drawn back.  And there was an interval!  Halfway through the film it stopped, across came the curtains and off people went to get their ice-cream!  What a wonderful experience it was seeing a film in this iconic building 🙂

We had already decided to go into the village for something to eat, and we headed straight for the Indian restaurant.  The food was great in the restaurant but we actually wished they had turned us away as they’d squeezed us in where people normally wait for their takeaway, and then pretty much ignored us.

This was a wonderful last day however, before we moved on to Flamborough Head in the East Riding of Yorkshire.

 

A day in Caythorpe brings back happy childhood memories

The Sunday before the Grand Prix we visited some of my relatives in the little village of Caythorpe (& Frieston) which sits midway between Grantham and Lincoln.  This was a day full of memories for me as I spent many a happy family holiday here with my aunt and uncle (Audrey and Clarrie).

Calv was very much taken with where my cousins live, in an old cottage fronting onto the old village green.  Who knows where we might end up living in our retirement??

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The ‘other’ village green in Frieston

We had Sunday lunch in one of the 2 remaining Caythorpe village pubs, The Red Lion, which was lovely.  Following this we donned our walking boots and took the dogs, Wally and Murphy – 2 of the best behaved dogs I have ever met 🙂 – for a walk.

We headed first to the church, where John and Jude are very active.  This meant that we had more access than normal, and more information too.

The church itself, St Vincents, is Grade I listed and a rare example of a parish church with a double nave; it was built in the early 14th century.

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The interior of St Vincents in Caythorpe

At the end of 1859 a lightning strike damaged the top 25 feet of the steeple.  When it was repaired it was shortened by about 12 feet, causing a ‘bulge’ (known as ‘entasis’) at the top.

This information was learned not only from my cousins, but also from a lovely book by Christina Farley that I bought whilst visiting ( ISBN no. 978-0-948639-67-8).

However, the highlight of our visit was, for me anyway, the fact that I challenged myself to go all the way up the tower and into the steeple. Continue reading “A day in Caythorpe brings back happy childhood memories”